Lancaster County

Bridge Map

Lancaster County has the most covered bridges in Pennsylvania with 29 covered bridges. All of the covered bridges in Lancaster County, except for the Hunsecker's Mill Covered Bridge, Kurtz Mill Covered Bridge and the Willow Hill Covered Bridge, are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Most have been on the list since 1980.The bridges are an important tourist attraction, both economically and culturally. This is due to both their historical significance and, being in the heart of Pennsylvania Dutch country, the frequent, iconic Amish Horse and buggies bridge crossings. They are often visited in the form of covered bridge driving tours.
 

In the early to late 1800s there were approximately 1,500 covered bridges in the state of Pennsylvania. That number has decreased to just over 197 bridges, with more located in Lancaster County than any other county in the state. The remaining covered bridges in the county are a remnant of a time where most bridges in the United States were made from wood, since wood was relatively inexpensive and easy to acquire. Bridge making, however, was anything but easy and required significant cost, effort, and time. The cost of the building the bridges was covered by government funds or by private individuals building bridges across their land. Since the bridges were built from wood, they were covered to provide protection from the weather, dramatically extending the life of the bridges. Nevertheless, as floods and fires destroyed more bridges, they were eventually replaced or bypassed with more durable and longer-lasting reinforced concrete and steel beam bridges. Most of the existing bridges are owned by the county government which is responsible for periodic upkeep and maintenance.
 

Throughout the years, many of the existing covered bridges have been destroyed, but were later reconstructed. For example, in 1972 a number of the county's covered bridges were either destroyed or badly damaged as a result of flooding caused by Hurricane Agnes. Notably, the Zook's Mill Covered Bridge managed to survive despite being filled with a few feet of water. The Willow Hill Covered Bridge, a relatively new bridge built in 1962, is a reconstructed bridge using materials recovered from the old Miller's Farm and Good's Fording covered bridges.

The covered bridges in Lancaster County are all built of similar construction and appearance. Some of this is because many of the existing bridges were built by the same man, Elias McMellen, who built 12 of the existing bridges. The most common construction method used was that of the Burr arch truss. It is found in its single and double span forms in almost all of the covered bridges in the county, except for the Landis Mill Covered Bridge, multiple king post design. Somewhat ironically, this short bridge was built by Mcmellen who used the Burr arch truss design in every other bridge he built. The Pine Grove Covered Bridge and Herr's Mill Covered Bridge are the county's only double span covered bridges. While most of the bridges are situated in remote locations where there is limited traffic, a number of the bridges, such as Jackson's Sawmill Covered Bridge, were later reinforced with steel beams underneath the bridge floor and steel hanger rods on the sides to support heavier traffic or give the bridge additional support.

Historically, the Lancaster County covered bridges were painted with red sides and all-white portals. Today most of the bridges retain this pattern, however, some of the portals are painted red with white trim (such as on the Zooks Mill Covered Bridge) or all-red (such as on the Pool Forge Covered Bridge). A number of these bridges also have the side panels painted red on the inside of the bridge while leaving the trusses unpainted. The Keller's Mill Covered Bridge is painted all-white, the only one of its kind in the county. Three of the bridges, Buck Hill Covered Bridge, Schenck's Mill Covered Bridge, and Shearer's Covered Bridge, have horizontal side boards. The rest of the bridges have vertical .

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Baumgardner's Covered Bridge

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(GPS N39 55.84 W76 17.71)
( #38-36-25)

The Baumgardener's Covered Bridge is a covered bridge that spans Pequea Creek in Lancaster County,        Pennsylvania.  A county-owned and maintained bridge, its official designation is the Pequea #10 Bridge.

The bridge has a single span, wooden, double Burr arch trusses design with the addition of steel hanger rods. The deck is made from oak planks. It is painted red, the traditional color of Lancaster County covered bridges, on both the inside and outside. Both approaches to the bridge are painted in the traditional white color.

The bridge is located approximately 0.5 miles (0.80 km) north of Frogtown Road on Covered Bridge Road just to the east of Pennsylvania Route 234 in Martic Township.  It was listed on the National Rigister of Historic Places on December 11, 1980

The Baumgardener's Covered Bridge was built in 1860 by Davis Kitch at a cost of $1,284. In 1987 the bridge was restored after it was damaged in a flood the previous year. During the restoration process, which cost $200,000, the bridge was raised by 4 feet (1.2 m) and lengthened by 9 feet (2.7 m) to protect it from damage in potential future flooding. The length of the structure is 120 feet and the width is 15 feet. The bridge is open to all traffic

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Bitzer's Mill Covered Bridge

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(GPS N40 08.43 W 76 09.12)
(#38-36-04)

The Bitzer's Mill Covered Bridge is a covered bridge that spans the Conestoga River in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. It is the oldest bridge in the county still in use. A county-owned and maintained bridge, its official designation is the Big Conestoga #2 Bridge. The bridge is also called Martin's Mill Bridge, Eberly's Cider Mill Covered Bridge, and Fiand's/Fiantz's Covered Bridge.

The bridge has a single span, wooden, double Burr arch trusses design with the addition of steel hanger rods. The deck is made from oak planks. Added later, secondary steel I-beams support the bridge from underneath. The bridge is painted red on the outside, the traditional color of Lancaster County covered bridges. The inside of the bridge is not painted. Both approaches to the bridge are painted in the traditional white color. The bridge length is 98 feet and the width is 15 feet it is open to all traffic and in good condition.

In 1980 it was added to the National Register of Historical Places as structure number 80003516. It is located at near the junction of U.S. Route 222 and U.S. Route 322 southeast of Ephrata in West Earl Township. The bridge can be reached by going approximately 1.5 miles (2.4 km) south from U.S. Route 322 on Cabin Drive which becomes Conestoga Creek Road. A left onto Cider Mill Road leads straight to the bridge, which is visible from the intersection.

The bridge was built in 1846 by George Fink and Sam Reamsnyder at a cost of $1,115. They used a single span, wooden, double Burr arch truss construction. At some point later, steel I-beams were installed under the floor to add support to the oldest bridge in Lancaster County. The bridge has historically been referred to by a number of names that reflected the various mill owners. In 1962, it was proposed to replace the bridge with a concrete span, but the plan was discontinued after much public outcry.

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Bucher"s Mill Covered Bridge

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(GPS N40 12.47 W76 08.08)
(# 38-36-12)

The Bucher's Mill Covered Bridge or Butcher's Mill Covered Bridge is a covered bridge that spans Cocalico Creek in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. After the Landis Mill Covered Bridge, it is the second shortest covered bridge in the county. A county-owned and maintained bridge, its official designation is the Cocalico #2 Bridge.

The bridge has a single span, wooden, double Burr arch trusses design with the addition of steel hanger rods. The deck is made from oak planks. It is painted red, the traditional color of Lancaster County covered bridges, on both the inside and outside. Both approaches to the bridge are painted in the traditional white color. The structure has a length of 64 feet and the width is 15 feet it is open to all traffic and in good condition.

In 1980 it was added to the National Register of Historical Places as structure number 80003514. It is located at  the northeast of Ephrata Pennsylvania off Pennsylvania Route 272 on Cocalico Creek Road.

The Bucher's Mill Covered Bridge was built in 1891 by Elias McMellen, using single span, wooden, double Burr arch truss construction, at a cost of $1167. A year later, in 1892, the bridge was damaged heavily in a flood and was rebuilt by McMellen for $1025.

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Buck Hill Farm Covered Bridge

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(GPS N40 07.915 W076 18.06)
(# 38-36-15)

The Buck Hill Covered Bridge, Eichelberger's Covered Bridge, or Abram Hess' Mill Bridge is a covered bridge located in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. It is located on the Buck Hill Farm's pond on private property. In 1980 it was added to the National Register of Historic Places as structure number 80003528.

The original build date and builder of the covered bridge is unknown. However, it was probably built around 1825 to provide access to Abram Hess's store. In 1844 the bridge was sold to George Eichelberger. That same year the bridge was heavily damaged in a flood and had to be repaired. It was rebuilt by Theodore D. Cochran at a cost of $799. The bridge was moved, in 1966, to the Buck Hill Farm, a private farm located in Warwick Township 1.2 kilometers (0.75 mi) south of Kissel Hill on Pennsylvania Route 501.

The bridge is 58 feet long and 15 feet wide, it is in fair condition it crosses a farm pond and only open to foot traffic. The structure is owned and maintained privately, permission must be obtained before entering the bridge. The landscaping surrounding the bridge is very beautiful, and when I was there in June of 2011 it was  well groomed. This is one of the many natural wood bridges I have really enjoyed photographing.

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Colemanville Covered Bridge

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( GPS N39 53.931 W76 20.533)
(# 38-36-26)

The Colemanville Covered Bridge is a covered bridge that spans Pequea Creek in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania.  After Hunsececker's Mill Covered Bridge, it is Lancaster County's second-longest single-span covered bridge still being used. It is also referred to as the Martic Forge Covered Bridge and Pequea #12 Bridge.

The bridge has a single span, wooden, double Burr arch design with the addition of steel hanger rods. The deck is made from oak planks. It is painted red, the traditional color of Lancaster County covered bridges, on both the inside and outside. Both approaches to the bridge are painted red with white trim. The length is 170 feet and the width is 15 feet, it is open to all traffic and is in good condition.

 In 1980 it was added to the National Register of Historical Places as structure number 80003534. The bridge is located on Fox Hollow Road just south of Pennsylvania route 324 in Martic Township,Pennsylvania.

The Colemanville Covered Bridge was originally built in 1856 by James C. Carpenter at a cost of $2,244. After being damaged twice by flooding, it was partially rebuilt in 1938 by Edmund Gardner and 1973 by David Esh. Lancaster county completely rebuilt the bridge in 1992 for $350,000. During the restoration process the bridge was raised by 6 feet (1.8 m) and moved west a few feet to protect it from damage in potential future flooding.

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Erb's Covered Bridge

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(GPS N40 10.04 W76 14.64)
(# 38-36-34)

The Erb's Covered Bridge is a covered bridge that spans Hammer Creek in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania.  A county-owned and maintained bridge, its official designation is the Hammer Creek #1 Bridge.

The bridge has a single span, wooden, double Burr arch trusses design with the addition of steel hanger rods. The deck is made from oak planks. It is painted red, the traditional color of Lancaster County covered bridges, on both the inside and outside. Both approaches to the bridge are painted in the traditional white color.

 In 1980 it was added to the National Register of Historical Places as structure number 80003536 The bridge can be found on Erb's Bridge Road north of Picnic Woods Road approximately 1 mile north of Pennsylvania route 772 and Rothsville, Pennsylvania.

The bridge was originally built in 1849 for a cost of $700. It was built on the Erb family's tract of land in the farming region along Hammer CreekIn 1887 the bridge was rebuilt by John G. Bowman for $1744.

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Forry's Covered Bridge

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(GPS N40 04.06 W76 20.68)
(# 38-36-28)

 Forry's Mill Covered Bridge is a covered bridge that spans Chicques Creek in West Hempfield in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. A county-owned and maintained bridge, its official designation is the Big Chiques #7 Bridge. (Chiques Creek was known as Chickies Creek until 2002). This is one of forty seven bridges either built or repaired in Lancaster County by Elias McMellen and is named for the Forry family who lived in the old stone house located on the adjoining property.

The bridge has a single span, wooden, double Burr arch trusses design with the addition of steel hanger rods. The deck is made from oak planks. It is painted red, the traditional color of Lancaster County covered bridges, on both the inside and outside. Both approaches to the bridge are painted in the traditional white color. The bridge was built in 1869 by Elias McMellen, the length of the structure is 103 feet and the with is 15 feet.  The bridge is open to vehicle traffic and is in very good condition. In 1980 it was added to the National Register of Historic Places as structure number 80003512. 

Forry's Mill Covered Bridge is located in West Hempfield Township on Bridge Valley Road 0.4 km (0.25 mi) north of Pennsylvania route 23 5.5 km (3.4 mi) east of Marietta less than a mile away from the Siegrist's Mill Covered Bridge.

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Herr's Covered Bridge

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(GPS N40 00.50 W76 09.73)
(# 38-36-21)

The Herr's Mill Covered Bridge is a covered bridge that spans Pequea Creek in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania.  It is also sometimes known as Soudersburg Bridge.

The bridge has a double span, wooden, double Burr arch truss design. It is painted red on the outside, the traditional color of Lancaster County covered bridges. Both approaches to the bridge are painted in the traditional white color. The length is 178 feet and the width is 15 feet, this bridge is blocked off and admits no traffic at all. The bridge is in fare condition.

 In 1980 it was added to the National Register of Historical Places as structure number 80003537. It is located in Paradise Township on Ronks Road 0.4 km (0.25 mi) south of U.S. Route 300 to the east of Lancaster city.

Herr's Mill Covered Bridge was built in 1844 by Joseph Elliot and Robert Russell at a cost of $1787.It has a double-span, double-arch Burr arch truss construction. In 1875 the bridge was rebuilt by James C. Carpenter at a cost of $1860. The bridge was later bypassed by a new concrete bridge and is now on the private property of the Mill Bridge Village Camping Resort. In 2006, after plans to demolish the bridge were reported, owner Brian Kopan was quoted as saying "The bridge is in fine condition. We’re hoping to keep it as it is.

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Hunsecker's Mill Covered Bridge

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(GPS N40 05.244 W76 14.862)
(# 38-36-06)

The Hunsecker's Mill Covered Bridge is a covered bridge located in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania.  The bridge has a single span, wooden, double Burr arch trusses design. The bridge, which spans the Conestoga River, is 180 feet  long and 15 feet wide, making it the longest single span covered bridge in the county. The bridge is open to all traffic and in good condition.

This bridge unlike most historic covered bridges in the county, is not listed on the National Register of Historic Places.  The bridge is approximately one mile southeast of Pennsylvania route 272 and is 0.5 miles (0.8 km) north of Pennsylvania Route 23 off Mondale Road on Hunsecker's Road, just west of the community of Hunsecker. The bridge divides the road on which it is upon into Hunsecker Road (East) in Upper Leacock Township and Hunsicker Road (West) in Manheim Township.

The original bridge was built in 1843 by John Russell at a cost of $1,988. It was and is a double Burr arch truss system. It has been swept away in flooding numerous times, most recently in 1972 after Hurricane Agnes. Waters lifted the original structure off its abutments and carried it downstream. In 1973, following destruction from the hurricane, it was rebuilt at a cost of $321,302.

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Jackson's Saw Mill Covered Bridge

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(GPS N39 53.82 W76 04.80)
( #38-36-33)

The Jackson's Sawmill Covered Bridge or Eichelbergers Covered Bridge is a covered bridge that spans the West Branch of the Octoraro Creek in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. A county owned and maintained bridge, its official designation is the West Octoraro # 1 Bridge. The bridge is purportedly the only covered bridge in the county that is not built perpendicular to the stream it crosses due to the placement of the sawmill on one side of the bridge and the rock formations faced by the builders on the other side.

The bridge has a single span, wooden, double  design with the addition of steel hanger rods. The deck is made from oak planks. It is painted red, the traditional color of Lancaster County covered bridges, on both the inside and outside. Both approaches to the bridge are painted in the traditional white color.

 In 1980 it was added to the National Register of Historical Places as structure number 80003520, but it was removed from the Register in 1986 It is located at The bridge lies in Bart Twonship, 3.25 mi (5.2 km) to the east of Quarryville and 1.5 mi (2.4 km) south of Pennsylvania Route 372 on Mt Pleasant Road. Due to its remote location in an isolated part of the county, it is seen less than many of the county's other covered bridges that are closer to the major populations centers such as Lancaster.
 

The bridge was built in 1878 by John Smith and Samuel Stauffer at a cost of $2,410. In 1985 it was destroyed in a flood and was rebuilt at a cost to the county of $75,000. During the rebuilding, the bridge was raised 3 feet (1 m) to protect it against future flooding. As of the summer of 2006, the bridge was in good conditions having undergone a recent rehabilitation in May 2005.

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Kaufman's Distillery Covered Bridge

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(GPS N40 08.89 W76 24.59)
(#38-36-32)

Kauffman's Distillery Covered Bridge or Sporting Hill Bridge is a covered bridge that spans Chiques Creek in Lancaster County; Pennsylvania. A county-owned and maintained bridge, its official designation is the Big Chiques #1 Bridge. (Chiques Creek was known as Chickies Creek until 2002)

The bridge has a single span, wooden, double Burr arch trusses design with the addition of steel  hanger rods. The deck is made from oak planks,it is painted red, the traditional color of LancasterCounty covered bridges, on both the inside and outside. Both approaches to the bridge are painted in the traditional white color. The length of the structure is 96 feet and the width is 15 feet it is in very good condition and open to vehicle traffic. This is a bridge where parking spaces are not available and you have very little room in pulling off the road.

The bridge's in 1980 was added to the National Register of Historic Places as structure number 80003529. The bridge is located southwest of Manheim between Rapho and Penn Townships 0.15 miles (0.24 km) southeast of Pennsylvania Route 772 and 1.4 miles (2.25 km) west of Pennsylvania Route 72 on Sun Hill Road.

Kauffman's Distillery Covered Bridge was originally built in 1857 at a cost of $1,185 by James C. Carpenter. The bridge was named after the Kauffman's Distillery Mill which operated in the late 1800s. In 1874 the bridge was rebuilt by Elias McMellen at a cost of $1,620.

When first constructed, this bridge was associated with a local distillery owned by the Kauffman family near the village of Sporting Hill. It is reported that once a month the Kauffman family traveled in a large loop selling whiskey to the surrounding towns.  Today the area surrounding the bridge is open farmland in a beautiful and appropriate setting.

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Keller's Mill Covered Bridge

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(GPS N40 09.851 W76 13.949)
(# 38-36-14)

The Keller's Mill Covered Bridge is a covered bridge that spans Cocalico Creek in EphrataTownship, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. A county-owned and maintained bridge, its official designation is the Cocalico #5 Bridge. It is also sometimes known as Guy Bard Covered Bridge (after a local jurist) and Rettew's Covered Bridge (after the person that Rettew's Road is named).

Due to heavy road traffic on the aging, one-lane bridge, construction on a new steel and concrete bridge to bypass the covered bridge occurred in the summer of 2006. According to Ephrata Township supervisor Clark Stauffer, the bridge has been disassembled and will be reassembled a few miles downstream to replace an existing one lane Mill Creek Road bridge

Keller's Mill Covered Bridge was originally built by Elias McMellen in 1873 at a cost of $2,075. After being swept away in flooding, the bridge was rebuilt in 1891, again by McMellen. It stayed there until it was disassembled and moved in 2006. The bridge was reopened on Middle Creek Road in December 2010.
 

Keller's Mill Covered Bridge has a single span, wooden, double Burr arch trusses design with the addition of steel hanger rods. The deck is made from oak planks. The bridge is the only all white bridge in the county, the only bridge to have survived the transition from whitewashing to the red color commonly used in barns throughout the county. The bridge is not painted on the inside. The length of the bridge is 74 feet and the width is 15 feet, it is open to all traffic and in very good condition.

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Kurt's Mill Covered Bridge

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(GPS N40 00.91 W76 16.93)
(# 38-36-03)

The Kurtz's Mill Covered Bridge is a covered bridge that spans Mill Creek  in the Lancaster County Park in Lancaster County County, Pennsylvania. The bridge is also known as the County Park Covered Bridge, Baer's Mill Covered Bridge, Isaac Baer’s Mill Bridge, Keystone Mill Covered Bridge, Binder Tongue Carrier Covered Bridge, and Mill 2A Covered Bridge. The bridge is accessible to road traffic from within the park.

The bridge has a single span, wooden, double burr arch trusses design with the addition of steel hanger rods. The deck is made from oak planks. It is painted red, the traditional color of Lancaster County Covered Bridges,on both the inside and outside. Both approaches to the bridge are painted in red with white trim.

 Unlike most historic covered bridges in the county, it is not listed on the National Register of Historical Places.

The bridge was built in 1876 by W. W. Upp over the Conestoga River. In 1972, it was damaged by the floodwaters caused by Hurricane Agnes. It was repaired by David Esh in 1975 and moved to its present location in the Lancaster County Park over Mill Creek, a tributary of the Conestoga River. The length of the bridge is 94 feet and the width is 15 feet, it is open to all traffic and in good condition.

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Landis Covered Bridge

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(GPS N40 04.08 W76 20.69)
(# 38-36-16)

Landis Mill Covered Bridge is a covered bridge that spans the Little Conestoga Creek . A county-owned and maintained bridge, its official designation is the Little Conestoga #1 Bridge. The bridge, built in 1873 by Elias McMellen, is today surrounded by a development, shopping center, and highways on the boundary of Lancaster At 53 feet (16.2 m), it is the shortest covered bridge in the county.

The bridge has a single span, wooden, double pyramidal-shaped Burr type trusses and multiple king post truss design with the addition of steel hanger rods. It is the only bridge in the county to use this design. The deck is made from oak planks. It is painted red, the traditional color of Lancaster County covered birdges, on both the inside and outside. Both approaches to the bridge are painted in red with white trim. The bridge is a length of 53 feet and a with of 15 feet, it is open to vehicle traffic and in very good condition.

 In 1980 it was added to the National Register of Historic Places as structure number 80003526. It can be found northwest of Lancaster on Shreiner Road one block West of the Park City Center shopping mall.

Landis Mill Covered Bridge was built in 1873 by Elias McMellen at a cost of $969. McMellen, who built many of Lancaster's covered bridges using the Burr arch truss, chose to build this short bridge using a simpler design with multiple kingpost trusses and, instead of Burr arches, pyramidal-shaped trusses to add additional support. The bridge has remained despite the development of the surrounding countryside.

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Leaman Place Covered Bridge

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(GPS N40 00.736 W76 06.477)
(# 38-36-20)

The Leaman's Place Covered Bridge is a covered bridge that spans Pequea Creek in Lancaster County,Pennsylvania. A county-owned and maintained bridge, its official designation is the Pequea #4 Bridge. The bridge is also known as Eshelman's Mill Covered Bridge and Paradise Bridge.

The bridge has a single span, wooden, double Burr arch trusses design with the addition of steel hanger rods. The deck is made from oak planks. It is painted red, the traditional color of Lancaster County covered bridges, on both the inside and outside. Both approaches to the bridge are painted in the traditional white color. The length of the structure is 113 feet and the width is 15 feet, it is in good condition and open to all traffic.

The bridge's was added in 1980, it is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as structure number 80003519. It is located on the boundary between Paradise and Leacock townships. It is found 0.5 miles (0.8 km) north of U.S. Route 30 on Belmont Road to the west of Paradise.

The land that the Leaman's Place Covered Bridge is situated on was settled by the family of Mary Ferree in 1712, a land grant by William Penn in an area inhabited by the Pequaws indians. It was not until 1845 that James C. Carpenter built the covered bridge across the Pequea Creek at a cost of $933.00. In 1893, Elias McMellan rebuilt the covered bridge at a cost of $2,431. The bridge was rehabilitated in 2004.

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Lime Valley Covered Bridge

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(GPS N39 57.64 W76 14.10)
(# 38-36-23)

The Lime Valley Covered Bridge or Strasburg Bridge is a covered bridge that spans Pequea Creek in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. A county-owned and maintained bridge, its official designation is the Pequea #8 Bridge.

The bridge has a single span, wooden, double Burr arch trusses design with the addition of steel hanger rods. The deck is made from oak planks. It is painted red, the traditional color of Lancaster County covered bridges, on both the inside and outside. Both approaches to the bridge are painted in the traditional white color. The bridge is 103 feet long and 15 feet wide, the structure is open to daily traffic.

The bridge was added in 1980, it is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as structure number 80003535. It is located close to U.S. Route 222 southeast of Sillow Street in West Lampeter Township, Pennsylvania. From 222 the bridge is 0.35 miles (0.56 km) east on Lime Valley Road, 0.3 miles (0.5 km) south on South View Road, and 250 feet (75 m) on Bremenam Road.

It was built in 1871 by either Joseph Cramer or Elias McMellan at a cost of $3,500. The bridge was a twin to another covered bridge built in 1857 by Silas Wolverton that was located 200 ft. (61 m) to the west of the Lime Valley Covered Bridge.

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Neff's Mill Covered Bridge

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(GPS 39 58.73 W76 13.55)
( # 38-36-22 )

The Neff's Mill Covered Bridge or Bowman's Mill Covered Bridge is a covered bridge  that spans the Pequea Creek on the border between West Lampeter Township and Strasburg Township in Lwancaster County, Pennsylvania. A county-owned and maintained bridge, its official designation is the Pequea #7 Bridge.

The bridge has a single span, wooden, double Burr arch trusses design with the addition of steel hanger rods. The deck is made from oak planks. It is painted red, the traditional color of Lancaster County covered bridges, on both the inside and outside. Both approaches to the bridge are painted in the traditional white color. It is purportedly the narrowest covered bridge in the county.The bridge length is 102 feet and the width is 15 feet, it is in good condition and opened to daily traffic.

The bridge was added in 1980, it is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as structure number 80003538. It is located at on Penn Grant Road 1.25 miles to the east of U.S. Route 222 and to the south of Lampeter, Pennsylvania and Pennsylvania Route 741.

The covered bridge was originally built by Christian Brackbill in 1824 for an unknown cost. It was known as Bowman's Mill Covered Bridge. It was rebuilt in 1875 by James C. Carpenter at a cost of $1,860.

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Pinetown Covered Bridge

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(GPS N40 06.31 W76 14.94)
(# 38-36-05)

The Pinetown Bushong's Mill Covered Bridge is a covered bridge that spans the Conestoga River in Lancaster County, Pennsyvania.. A county-owned and maintained bridge, its official designation is the Big Conestoga #6 Bridge. The bridge is also known as Pinetown Covered Bridge, Nolte's Point Mill Bridge and Bushong's Mill Bridge.

The bridge has a single span, wooden, double Burr arch trusses design with the addition of steel hanger rods. The deck is made from oak planks. It is painted red, the traditional color of Lancaster County covered bridges, on both the inside and outside. Both approaches to the bridge are painted in red with white trim, the length of the bridge is 133 feet and the width is 15 feet,

The bridge's was added in 1980 to the National Register of Historic Places as structure number 80003527. The structure is located on Township Route 620 just east of State Route 1029, approximately 0.5 mile southeast of Oregon, between Upper Leacock and Manheim townships.

The bridge was built in 1867 by Elias McMellen at a cost of $4,500. In 1972 it was destroyed as a result of flooding caused by Hurricane Agnes. Due to a tremendous response of area residents who signed a petition for its reconstruction, it was among the first covered bridges to be restored after Agnes. In the spring of 1973 the bridge was rebuilt by the nearby Amish. To prevent damage due to future flooding, they raised the bridge to 17 feet 6 inches (5.33 m) above the average water line. However, the bridge was closed after flood damage sustained due to Tropical Storm Lee in 2011.

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Pool Forge Covered Bridge

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( GPS N40 07.792 W75 58.580 )
( #38-36-01 )

The Pool Forge Covered Bridge is a covered bridge that spans the Conestoga River in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. The bridge is now on private property where it was once used as a storage barn before the owner added a road to receive vehicle traffic.

The bridge has a single span, wooden, double Burr arch trusses design with the addition of steel hanger rods. It is painted entirely red, the traditional color of Lancaster County covered bridges on the outside. The inside of the bridge is not painted. Both approaches to the bridge are painted in red without any of the traditional white paint. The bridge was built in 1859 by Levi Fink and Elias McMellen, the length of the bridge is 99 feet and the width is 15 feet

The bridge was added in 1980 to the National Register of Historic Places as structure number 80003510. It is located just east of Township Route 679, just south of State Route 23  between Churchtown and Goodville in Caernarvon Township.

It is included in the Poole Forge historic district as a contributing structure.

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Red Run Covered Bridge

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( GPS N40 10.52 W76 04.85 )
( #38-36-10 )

The Red Run Covered Bridge or Oberhaltzer's Covered Bridge is a covered bridge that once spanned the Muddy Creek im Lamcaster County, Pennsylvania. It was built in 1866 by Elias McMellen and is currently situated on private property next to the Red Run Campground. It is 107 feet long with a width of 15 feet and is also known as the Oberholzer's Covered Bridge. The structure is closed to traffic.

The bridge has a single span, wooden, double Burr arch trusses. It is painted red, the traditional color of Lancaster County covered bridges, on the outside. Both approaches to the bridge are painted in the traditional white color.

The bridge was added in 1980 to be listed on the National Register of Historical Places as structure number 80003539. The bridge is located just east of Township Route 816, approximately 1 mile south of Red Run in Earl Township, on the property of Red Run Campground.

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Schenk's Mill Covered Bridge

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(GPS N40 06.96 W76 25.53)
(#38-36-30)

Schenk's Mill Covered Bridge or Shenk's Mill Covered Bridge is a covered bridge that spans the Big Chiques Creek in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. A county-owned and maintained bridge, its official designation is the Big Chiques #4 Bridge. (Chiques Creek was known as Chickies Creek until 2002). The bridge was built in 1885 by Charles Malhorn and Levi Fink. It is located on Township Route 372, Rapho Township, where it becomes Township Route 552, East Hempfield Township, approximately 1.8 miles northwest of Landisville, between Rapho and East Hempfield townships. The length is 96 feet and the width is 15 feet, it is is good condition and open to all traffic.

The bridge has a single span, wooden, double Burr arch trusses design with the addition of steel hanger rods. The deck is made from oak planks. It is painted red, the traditional color of Lancaster County covered bridges, on both the inside and outside. Both approaches to the bridge are painted in the traditional white color. It is one of only 3 covered bridges in the county with horizontal side boards.

This bridge is located in a beautiful well maintained rural setting, the Schenk's Mill Bridge is unusual in Lancaster County for several reasons: it has horizontal clapboard siding, has two long horizontal windows on either side of the eastern end of the structure, and the Burr arch is only about half as high as similar bridges in the county.  It is built on stone and mortar abutments that extend on ether end into lengthy wingwalls. The original Schenk farmhouse and mill are still standing. Today they are used as the headquarters for local building contractor who has been responsible for some very attractive contemporary homes in the area. 

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Shearer's Covered Bridge

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(GPS N40 10.29 W76 23.39)
(#38-36-31

Shearer's Covered Bridge is a covered bridgethat spans the Big Chiques Creek in Lancaster County Pennsylvania. (Chiques Creek was known as Chickies Creek until 2002)

The original Shearer's Bridge was built in 1847 over Chickies Creek at a cost of about $600. In 1856 it was rebuilt for $1,200. In 1971 it was moved four miles to Manheim Memorial Park across from the high school at a cost of $12,000. Today, estimated costs of rehabilitation are extremely higher. It still crosses Chickes Creek(Chiques Creek). Its style is similar to Shenk's Mill Bridge. The length of the structure is 89 feet and the width is 15 feet, it is in good condition and only open to foot traffic.

The bridge has a single span, wooden, double Burr arch trusses design. It is the only covered bridge in the county painted entirely in red, the traditional color of Lancaster County covered bridges, on both the inside and outside including both approaches. The other all red bridge, Pool Forge Covered Bridge, is only painted on the outside. It is one of only 3 covered bridges in the county with horizontal side boards.

The bridge was added in 1980, to the National Register of Historic Places as structure number 80003532.

The bridge was built in 1847 by Jacob Clare. It was rebuilt in 1855 and stayed there until it was moved in 1971 to its present location in the Manheim Memorial Park.

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Siegrist's Mill Covered Bridge

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(GPS N40 04.62 W76 28.26)
(#38-36-37)

(Alert Update:  This bridge has been destroyed by the flash flooding of tropical storm Lee on September 8, 2011) (Click here for editorial)

Siegrist's Mill Covered Bridge is a covered bridge that spans the Big Chiques Creek in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. A county-owned and maintained bridge, its official designation is the Big Chiques #6 Bridge. (Chiques Creek was known as Chickies Creek until 2002).

The bridge was built in 1855 by James C. Carpenter. It was named after the Siegrist family who lived nearby. The structure has a  single span, wooden, double Burr arch trusses design with the addition of steel hanger rods. The deck is made from oak planks. It is painted red, the traditional color of Lancaster County covered bridges, on both the inside and outside. Both approaches to the bridge are painted in the traditional white color. The length of the structure is 91 feet and the width is 15 feet, it is in good condition and opened to all traffic. The bridge is located on Township Route 360, Rapho Township, where it meets Township Route 669, West Hempfield Township, approximately 2 miles north of Ironville, between Rapho and West Hempfield townships.

This is one of the few bridges that withstood the wrath of Hurricane Agnes in 1972. It suffered only minor damage. Like many of the other Lancaster County bridges, it is in a charming setting. The local residents tell a story about two occupants of the county poorhouse, Bum Frank and John Weiskopf, who lived under the bridge during the summer months while the hired themselves out to the Siegrist family to work the farm. Mrs. Siegrist even gave them soap about once every other week so they could bathe in the creek. In severe weather they slept in the barn; in the fall, they returned to the poorhouse.

The bridge was added in 1980 to the National Register of Historic Places as structure number 80003513. It is located in a remote region of western Lancaster County at  The bridge is less than a mile away from the Forry's Mill Covered Bridge.

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Weaver's Mill Covered Bridge

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( GPS N40 08.47 W75 59.87 )
( # 38-36-02 )

The Weaver's Mill Covered Bridge is a covered bridge that spans the Conestoga River in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. The 85-foot-long (26 m), 15-foot-wide (4.6 m) bridge was built in 1878 by B. C. Carter and J. F. Stauffer across Conestoga River. It is also known as Isaac Shearer's Mill Bridge.

The bridge has a single span, wooden, double Burr arch trusses design with the addition of steel hanger rods. It is painted red, the traditional color of Lancaster County covered bridges, on both the inside and outside. Both approaches to the bridge are painted in the traditional white color. The bridge is in good condition and open to daily traffic.

The bridge was added in 1980 to be listed on the National Register of Historic Places as structure number 80003511.It is located on Township Route 773, between State Route 1021 and State Route 1044, approximately one mile north of Goodville in Caenarvon Township.

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White Rock Forge Covered Bridge

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( GPS N39 49.48 W76 05.40 )
( # 38-36-18 )

The White Rock Forge Covered Bridge or White Rock Covered Bridge is a covered bridge that spans the West Branch  of the Octoraro Creek in southeast Lancaster County County, Pennsylvania. A county-owned and maintained bridge, its official designation is the West Octoraro #2 Bridge. It was built in 1847 by John Russell and Elias McMellen, but the original was destroyed and rebuilt in 1884. The wooden burr truss structure  is 103 feet long and 13 feet wide. It is in good condition and open to daily traffic.

The bridge has a single span, wooden, double Burr arch trusses design with the addition of steel hanger rods. The deck is made from oak planks. It is painted red, the traditional color of Lancaster County covered bridges, on both the inside and outside. Both approaches to the bridge are painted in the traditional white color.

The bridge in 1980 was added to the list on the National Register of Historic Places as structure number 80003522. It is located on Township Route 337, just east of the junction with Township Route 490 in White Rock, between Little Britain and Coletrain Township.

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Willow Hill Covered Bridge

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( GPS N40 01.463 W76 12.093 )
( # 38-36-43 )

The Willow Hill Covered Brdge is a covered bridge located off U.S. Route 30 that spany Miller's Run (which flows into Mill Creek a tributary of the Conestoga River) in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. It was built in 1962 by Roy Zimmerman as a reconstruction using parts of the Miller's Farm Covered Bridge, built in 1871 by Elias McMellen, and Good's Fording Covered Bridge, built in 1855, it crosses Mill Creek and is 93 feet and 15 feet wide.

The bridge has a single span, wooden, double Burr arch trusses design with the addition of steel hanger rods. It is painted red, the traditional color of Lancaster County covered bridges, on the outside.  The inside is unpainted. Both approaches to the bridge are painted in the traditional white color. The bridge is in good condition and open to daily traffic.

Because it was constructed from two historic covered bridges, it is not listed on the National Register of Historic Places like most of the other covered bridges in the county.

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Zook's Mill Covered Bridge

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( GPS N40 07.816 W76 13.883 )
( # 38-36-14 )

The Zook's Mill Covered Bridge is a covered bridge that spans Cocalico Creek in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. A county owned and maintained bridge, its official designation is the Cocalico # 7 Bridge. The bridge is also known as Wenger Covered Bridge or Rose Hill Covered Bridge.  It is located west of Brownstown on T797, near the Warwick and West Earl  Townships.

The bridge has a single span, wooden, double Burr arch trusses design with the addition of steel hanger rods.  The deck is made from oak planks. It is painted red, the traditional color of Lancaster County covered bridges, on both the inside and outside. Both approaches to the bridge are painted red with white trim.

The bridge is 74 feet long and 13 feet 3 inches wide.  The structure was built in 1849 by Henry Zook. Unlike many other bridges in the county the bridge withstood Hurricane Agnes, despite being filled with 6 1/2' of water. 

The bridge has been added in 1980, to the list on the National Register of Historic Places as structure number 80003508.  

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