Greene County

Bridge Map

There are seven covered bridges still standing in Greene County, and the first thing I noticed was that all were painted white or left natural. Also all the bridges utilize the Queenpost or Kingpost truss design.  Every one of the bridges is in good condition and still used by vehicle traffic.

 Every year two Pennsylvania counties, Washington and Greene hold a covered bridge festival. It's always in September and is a great way to spend a weekend. The two counties join together to hold this yearly event. Arts & crafts, home-style food, historical exhibits, unique entertainment & more! Each bridge has a charm of its own. Greene County's annual festival is held at two of the seven remaining covered bridges in Greene County and at eight of the covered bridges in Washington County.

The admission price is free. Several of the bridges will have food stands, entertainment, and crafts. You can visit all of the remaining covered bridges in the counties during these days. There are 28 covered bridges still standing in Washington and Greene counties. Pennsylvania has 197 covered bridges still standing statewide. Some you are unable to drive through, but many you can still walk through. For more information on our Covered Bridge Festival, contact the Greene County Tourist Promotion Agency at 724-627-8687. Or email: Greene County Tourism

Carmichaels Covered Bridge

Photo Album

(GPS N39 53.92 W79 58.63)
 (#38-30-21)

This is one of seven covered ridges still standing within the boundaries of Greene County. The Carmichaels bridge is covered with white, vertical board and batten siding on both the s ides and portals, has a rood of sheet metal and a deck of lengthwise planking in the tire track area laid over crosswise planking. It rests on a cut stone and mortar abutments that are extended to road level wingwalls. one of the abutments has been reinforced with concrete, The queenpost truss is reinforced with additional diagonal timbers, but there is no evidence of additional steel reinforcement.

The structure was built in 1889 utilizing the Queenpost design and crosses over Muddy Creek in Cumberland Township. The bridge is 64 feet long and 15 feet wide, the builder of the bridge is unknown. The surrounding property and bridge is owned and maintained by Greene County.

King Covered Bridge

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(GPS N39 45.42 W80 16.35)
 (#38-30-24)

With a few boards missing here and there on the sides, this rustic bridge is covered with unpainted random-width vertical board siding. The roof is covered with steel metal and the deck with crosswise planking. The structure of the bridge rests on cut stone abutments, which are extended to form short wingwalls slightly higher than the road level. It has the typical narrow lengthwise openings under the eves. The King Bridge has no evidence of any steel reinforcement. It is open to vehicular traffic with the average three-ton weight limit.

On June 16, 2005, the Greene County Board of Commissioners held a Ribbon Cutting Dedication Ceremony at the Woods Covered Bridge located in Center Township, and the King Covered Bridge, located in Wayne Township. The dedication ceremony for both bridges took place at the Woods Covered Bridge, on Oak Forest Road and Woods Road, in Center Township. Both the bridges were recently restored while preserving.

The King Bridge was built in 1890 utilizing the Queenpost design, it is 46 feet long and 15 feet 4 inches wide and crosses Hoover Run. The builder of this structure is unknown, Greene County own and maintains the bridge. The bridge is in good condition and open to vehicular traffic.

Lippincott Covered Bridge

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(GPS N39 56.59 W80 07.55)
 (#38-30-25)

The Lippincott/Cox Farm Bride boast a slightly unusual design. It is covered with white horizontal clapboard siding on both the exterior sides, part of the interior sides, and portals. The roof is covered with sheet metal, and the deck is covered with crosswise planking. The structure of the bridge rests on  two abutments, one of stone and mortar reinforced with concrete and one of all concrete. The abutments are extended to form short concrete wingwalls, approximately one and one half feet above the road level. The Kingpost truss structure is heavily reinforced with five steel "I" beams, but still only carries a four ton weight limit. Like most of the Greene County's other covered bridges, the Lippincott/Cox Farm Bridge is  located on a heavily traveled Township Road in an open rural area, This bridge was constructed in 1943 because of a shortage of steel during the war years.

The structure was built in 1943 and utilizes the Kingpost truss design and crosses Ruff Creek. The bridge is 27 feet long and 15 wide, it is owned and maintained by the county. the builder is unknown.  It is open to vehicular traffic.

Neddie Wood Covered Bridge

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(GPS N39 51.78 W80 14.09)
 (#38-30-26)

Serving as the oldest covered bridge that remains standing in Greene County, this bridge was names for Edward (Ned or Neddie) W. Wood, a Civil War veteran who owned the land on which the bridge was built in 1882. Standing in the open farmland countryside of Greene County, the Neddie Woods Bridge is covered on both sides and portals with unpainted vertical board siding. The roof is made of corrugated sheet metal, and the deck is covered with crosswise planking. The only side openings are fairly wide lengthwise ones immediately under the eaves. The structure is reinforced with five steel I beams and rest on cut stone abutments that appear to have been laid dry. It also is open to vehicular traffic with a posted load limit of four tons.


On June 16, 2005, the Greene County Board of Commissioners held a Ribbon Cutting Dedication Ceremony at the Woods Covered Bridge located in Center Township, and the King Covered Bridge, located in Wayne Township. The dedication ceremony for both bridges took place at the Woods Covered Bridge, on Oak Forest Road and Woods Road, in Center Township. Both the bridges were recently restored while preserving as much as possible of the original structures.

The bridge was built by Lisbon Scott utilizing the Queenpost design, it crosses Pursley Creek. The structure is 40 feet long and 15 feet wide, it is owned and maintained by the county. It is open to vehicular traffic.

Scott Covered Bridge

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 (GPS N39 53.27 W80 19.54)
 (#38-30-28)

Built in 1885, and covered with unpainted vertical board on both the sides and portals of the bridge, the Scott Bridge had a roof of sheet metal and a deck of crosswise planking. One side window is cut into the center of the Queenpost truss structure in addition to the typical lengthwise openings under the eaves of the bridge. The Scott Bridge has been reinforced with Steel I beams and rest on cut stone abutments. This covered bridge also remains open to vehicular traffic.

The structure is 41 feet long and 15 feet wide it crosses 10 Mile Creek. The bridge was built by William Lang, it is owned and maintained by Greene County.

Shriver Covered Bridge

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(GPS N39 51.17 W80 16.76)
(#38-30-29) 

 The Shriver is another of the Queenpost structures located in the open countryside of Greene County. It is covered with random-width unpainted vertical board siding on both sides and portals, has a sheet metal roof and a deck of crosswise planking. Fairly wide length-wise openings immediately under the eaves are the only side opening on the bridge. The Shriver is reinforced with steel I beams and rests on cut stone abutments that appear to have been laid dry and has wingwalls of similar material that extends a little above the road level.

The bridge was built in 1900 and crosses the Hargus Creek, the length is 40 feet and the width is 14 feet. The builder of the structure is unknown, the county owns and maintains the bridge, it is open to vehicular traffic.

White Covered Bridge

Photo Album

GPS N39 48.37 W80 03.65)
 (#38-30-30)

The White Bridge is the longest of the Queenpost structures located within Greene County. There is, however, a discrepancy concerning the date of this bridges construction. With the exception of the 1990 state survey, which determined that the bridge was built in 1900, all other sources suggest that the White Bridge was constructed around 1919. Charles Morris, born in 1911, grew up near this area. He remembers the White Bridge being built when he was a young boy and that prior to the building of the bridge there was a foot log across the creek just west of where the bridge now stands. If one wanted to cross the creek with a wagon or buggy, you had to ford the creek even though at times the water was too deep to permit crossing at all. In addition to being the longest covered bridge in Greene County; White Bridge is also an exceptionally high Queenpost structure. It has a clearance of 17 feet, 6 inches. With no evidence of steel reinforcement, the bridge boasts an exceptionally high load limit of ten-ton. It is covered with white vertical tongue-and-groove board siding on both the sides and the portals, a steel metal roof and a decking of lengthwise vertical planking in the tire track area laid over diagonal crosswise planking. The structure rests on cut stone-and-mortar wingwalls. There are typical narrow lengthwise openings under the eaves.

The bridge is 70 feet long and 15 feet wide and crosses Whitely Creek, the builder is unknown it is owned and maintained by the county. This structure is open to vehicular traffic.

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